What's Happening This Week: 11/10/19

Hi, welcome to the Cleveland Tech newsletter. I talk about all things tech in the Cleveland community. 

The Blockland Solutions Conference was kind enough to offer a discount to folks who subscribe to the newsletter. If you are looking to attend check out: https://www.blocklandsolutions.com and type CLETECH to save 20% on your ticket.

Profile of the Week

Name: Lucky Tavag
Current Job: V.P. Engineering / Co-founder at Axuall Inc. 
Favorite restaurant in town?: Currently - Sichuan Hot Pot Cuisine
Favorite thing about Cleveland? It's history and diversity. 

Q: Lucky, you went to Case Western and are from Cleveland, but decided to move to NYC a few years after graduation, what was the driving decision behind the move? One of the things I quickly realized while working in Cleveland was the lack of dynamics in career trajectory. Getting a job wasn't terribly easy given that I graduated right after the recession, and after receiving a glowing review accompanied by a 4% raise - I knew I needed a change of scenery. Encouraged by my now-wife, I connected with some friends out in NYC and found a company that would take a chance on me. Looking back, it’s easy to see why there is a lot of brain drain; There are some huge software companies on the east coast that recruit heavily from the city. Remote work is only making that easier.

Q: You've worked at a few startups in both Cleveland and in NYC, what were some of the differences between the NYC and Cleveland startup scene? I'm really glad you asked this question. The hiring process for startups is challenging no matter where you are, but Cleveland has been exceptionally hard. I initially attributed this to a lack of risk tolerance on the part of Engineers out here. But after some reflection, I realized that when you aren't at a tech hub like NYC, you are absorbing a much larger risk when you join a startup. I would also say it's fairly difficult to raise money in this city, something that I hope changes with a few successful exits.

Q: You are one of the co-founders of Axuall and just raised $3MM. Can you explain what Axuall is building and why you are a great place to work (Axuall is hiring and on a personal note, I think is an excellent place to work)? Axuall is building a digital marketplace for facts and credentials. We are envisioning what the future of resumes should be, and the accompanying efficiencies that will make the hiring process cheaper, faster and more reliable. Today, our browser's warn us when the genuineness of a website cannot be verified, there's no reason a hiring manager shouldn't have access to similar tools when evaluating a resume. 

Charlie Lougheed, Axuall's co-founder, and I have been committed from day 1 to ensuring that we create a culture that values diversity, autonomy, and collaborative learning. I truly want anyone who works here to be able to look back on time wonderfully spent - and see themselves as huge value creators.

Q: You originally started your career at AmTrust. For those looking to transition to a startup from a big company, what advice would you give them? I've generally found that the first 4-6 months of any job forces you to learn at a much faster rate. Once you get through that, at most jobs you start to get comfortable with the type of work that is coming your way. At most startup's every month is your first month. You are learning rapidly every month, and getting stretched in different dimensions. I spend some time each morning discerning what version of myself is needed. Startups are for people who are ready to experience discomfort in exchange for the rewarding feeling of accomplishment.

Q: Before founding Axuall, you worked at Votem. Votem's demise has been well-documented in the press. What were some of the learning lessons that you've taken away from that? 

Some really big takeaways for me were: 

  • Take advantage of the interview process as a way to vet your employer as well. If something seems wrong, it probably is.

  • This industry, like any other, is built on trust and relationships. Hold yourself accountable, and don’t be shy to hold others accountable as well.

  • Failures are inevitable, don't let them be a reason to give up on your career goals!

Companies Hiring

This Week’s Events

Future Events

Interesting Reads

  • Crain’s Cleveland: Readying for the next Scout RFP

  • TechCrunch: Workday to acquire online procurement platform Scout RFP for $540M

  • Cleveland Plain-Dealer: First interactive holographic ‘brain map,’ created by CWRU researchers, could make surgery more precise

Requests

  • Let me know if your company is hiring

  • Let me know if you are hosting an event

  • If you are interested or know someone who would be interested in being highlighted for our profile of the week, let me know.

About The Author

My name is Ari Lewis and I do comms/pr for technology companies and am a partner at venture capital firm focused on blockchain companies. Follow me on twitter @amlewis4 or connect with me on LinkedIn. Always open to meeting new folks. Email me if you want to get coffee.

What's Happening This Week: 11/03/19

Hi, welcome to the Cleveland Tech newsletter. I talk about all things tech in the Cleveland community. 

The Blockland Solutions Conference was kind enough to offer a discount to folks who subscribe to the newsletter. If you are looking to attend check out: https://www.blocklandsolutions.com and type CLETECH to save 20% on your ticket.

Profile of the Week

Name: Anthony Gonzalez
Current Job: Congressman for Ohio’s 16th District
Favorite restaurant in town? Townhall
Favorite thing about Cleveland?  The grit and determination Clevelanders have to band together and get things done.

Q: Congressman Gonzalez, obviously most people know you as a star football player who played at Ohio State and in the NFL. What many don't know, is you have a Stanford MBA and worked at a tech startup. Can you tell us about your time in the Bay Area? Well, the best thing that came out of my time in the Bay Area is that is where I met my wife, Elizabeth. On top of that, my main goal for my time out west was to diversify my business knowledge in the technology world so that I could apply that know-how back home. While I believe that Northeast Ohio can and should always place a very heavy emphasis on the manufacturing industry, I also believe that we need to find a way to participate in the digital economy. My time at Stanford and working in the tech sector was intentional so that I could bring that knowledge and skill-set back to Ohio. 

Q: One of your roles is being a member of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space and Technology (NASA Glenn is in Congressman Gonzalez's district), what is some of the bills you are working on in that committee Right now I’m working on a bill to combat manipulated media content known as “deepfakes” that has the potential to deceive the public and endanger our national security. Deepfakes aren’t a new phenomenon – they made an appearance in Forrest Gump – but rapid advances in technology over the past few years has put this technology in the hands of the masses with the ability to make it look like anyone said anything anywhere. That’s dangerous when you look at the potential effects of misinformation. The bill passed out of the committee just one week after I introduced it, which might be a new record.

I’ve also introduced the Securing American Science and Technology Act of 2019, known as SASTA, to address academic espionage at colleges and universities like Case Western and Ohio State. Universities throughout our state are on the cutting edge of innovation and advancement. This makes our research programs a target for nations like China, who we know are actively stealing our intellectual property and world-renowned research and development. It is critical for our national security and economic future that we do a better job preventing this form of foreign hostility and promote the great work being done at universities across our nation.

Q: Congressman, you just visited San Francisco with some local Cleveland people (full disclosure, I was on the trip). What were some of the takeaways from the trip One of the big components of our nation’s economic future is going to be in the technology sector, and there’s no reason that Northeast Ohio can’t or shouldn’t be a big part of that. We have incredible resources that are valuable assets to the Silicon Valley tech community – we have the labor force, the manufacturing infrastructure, the great researchers and universities, and on top of that, we have far lower housing and living costs than California. With this trip, I wanted to put Cleveland on the radar of some of these tech companies and learn how we can better promote Cleveland so that when some of these larger tech companies look to grow and expand they do it here.

Q: You have been vocal about China being a threat to innovation in America. How is Congress, combatting that threat to ensure America is staying as a leader in the innovation economy? I think you’d be hard-pressed to find a bigger China-hawk than me on either of the committees I sit on. Firstly, one of the bills I’m working on – SASTA, mentioned above – is aimed directly at protecting American research and innovation from academic espionage at the hands of China. You can learn more about that bill here.

Beyond that, I think it is critical that America successfully negotiate a new trade deal with China that will better defend against IP theft while also protecting American farmers and entrepreneurs looking to sell their goods abroad. In the past, China has forced our companies to transfer valuable intellectual property in order to do business in their country, which they then use to duplicate our products and undercut our prices. This is happening in every sector of the economy and works to undermine our workers as they are forced to compete with two hands tied behind their backs. This needs to end, and right now the most valuable thing Congress can do towards that end is to pass the USMCA trade deal negotiated with Canada and Mexico because it has many important provisions in the innovation economy that will serve as a basis for the negotiation with China. 

Q: What’s one thing your most proud of from your first nine months in Congress? I am most proud of the work that we have done providing outstanding constituent services to the district. Ralph Regula, who held this seat for over 40 years, had a saying "Constituents first." One way that we try to honor his legacy is by committing the office to doing just that. One way we do this is by bringing federal grand dollars back into the district. In the third quarter alone, my office has secured nearly $6 million in federal grant funding for causes like combatting domestic violence, serving disabled veterans through adaptive sports programs and improving local transportation infrastructure at Wayne County Airport. These are all critically important assets to our community here in Northeast Ohio that wouldn’t be possible without federal dollars to help them get on their feet. It is a real difference being made in our community that my constituents will be able to see and feel. It is moments like that when I am most humbled to be able to do this job and serve my community.

Constituents can send Congressman Gonzalez an email through his website at anthonygonzalez.house.gov/contact.

Companies Hiring

This Week’s Events

Future Events

Interesting Reads

  • Crain’s Cleveland: Gener8tor to launch startup accelerator programs in Cleveland in 2020, including one for bands and musicians

  • Crain’s Cleveland: Source Lunch with ... Mike Conley, chief information officer, Cleveland Cavaliers

  • Cleveland Plain-Dealer: Cleveland Rising: Big Bang or Flash in the Pan?

Requests

  • Let me know if your company is hiring

  • Let me know if you are hosting an event

  • If you are interested or know someone who would be interested in being highlighted for our profile of the week, let me know.

About The Author

My name is Ari Lewis and I do comms/pr for technology companies and am a partner at venture capital firm focused on blockchain companies. Follow me on twitter @amlewis4 or connect with me on LinkedIn. Always open to meeting new folks. Email me if you want to get coffee.

What's Happening This Week: 10/27/19

Hi, welcome to the Cleveland Tech newsletter. I talk about all things tech in the Cleveland community. 

The Blockland Solutions Conference was kind enough to offer a discount to folks who subscribe to the newsletter. If you are looking to attend check out: https://www.blocklandsolutions.com and type CLETECH to save 20% on your ticket.

Profile of the Week

Name: Rich Mazzola, CPA 
Current Job: Manager, Skoda Minotti’s Emerging Companies Practice 
Favorite restaurant in town? My all-time, every-day-of-the-week favorite is Bruno’s on 41st and Fulton. Good old fashioned Italian food.  However, I live in Gordon Square and love the restaurant scene there.  My wife and I really enjoy Luxe and Ninja City on the days where we don’t feel like cooking. 
Favorite thing about Cleveland? My favorite thing about Cleveland is the sports scene.  There are not many cities that have all three major sport teams downtown within 20 minutes walking distance of each other.  The community that forms when the Browns, Indians, or Cavs are winning is incredible and intoxicating.   My wife and I lived in Oklahoma City for a few years.  Every time Cleveland was playing, we would always find a community of fans in OKC, Dallas, or wherever we were that day.   

Q: Can you tell the readers about your new startup initiative at Skoda? After working at a start-up myself, I recognized a strong need in the start-up community to have a financial and accounting resource. Once I returned to the firm, and with strong backing from Skoda Minotti’s leadership, we launched the Emerging Companies practice in March 2019. We went public at JumpStart’s Startup Scaleup event this past June.  Since March, we’ve added 23 new start-up clients and assisted each of them in navigating the growing pains of launching a new business.

We recognize that emerging companies need dedicated, caring partners who can help navigate the challenges and complexities of early-stage development and transform big ideas into viable, growing businesses.  For entrepreneurs, that means that we aim to work alongside you at every stage of your journey, leveraging the deep experience and applying unique insights that position you for success, all within a rate that fits your budget.  Our services are focused on fractional accounting and operational services, board of directors’ governance, and investor relations services.   For a pre-seed company, for example, that means that we usually can help with financial projections and pitch-deck preparation.  If a pre-seed company needs help connecting with investors, we tap into our network to see if we can find interested parties as well (although I should clarify that we are not investment bankers).  As an emerging company continues to grow, we assist with setting up their internal accounting systems and processes with our fractional controller and CFO services. As a fractional CFO, our team acts as your financial expert, guiding you towards growth opportunities, understanding the financial implications of your business decisions, and interfacing with your investors and board of directors.  As a start-up continues to grow and hire department leadership, we can layer in our fractional COO, strategic marketing and IT services.  Our goal is to remove as many barriers to scaling for growth as possible.

Q: Being a service provider is significantly different than selling a product, can you talk about some of the tips you have for other service providers out there for finding clients and maintaining successful relationships? I’m sure I will sound like a broken record, but it’s all about relationships.  When selling a product, you are attempting to strike a nerve in a target market in order to create a need or desire.  Service providers are focused on the individual vs. the service offering they are working to sell. So when I say it’s all about relationships, there are two sides to that coin.  The first is you are only as good as the depth and the skills of your network.  You don’t have to know everything to be a successful advisor, but you need to have a network of other experts to leverage when the need arises.  So working and forming relationships with other service providers such as product development groups, angel fund networks, venture capitalists, community resources such as incubators, etc. that specialize in your niche area, will add validity to your work and the overall success of your client.  The second is obviously forming a relationship with your clients.  Some of my most successful client relationships ended up becoming great friends of mine, some even came to my wedding last year.  A foundation of any strong business relationship is trust.  Once you have trust, the client and their team understand that everything you do and say is and has always been in their best interest.  Not to say disagreements won't happen, but the concept of "disagree and commit" is formed.  Disagreeing and committing is a general business strategy to accelerate your internal innovation.  You won't always agree on the next steps in a business strategy or a solution to a business hurdle, but once a decision is reached, everyone on the team including you, as the advisor, commits to the decision and will execute wholeheartedly.  In terms of finding clients, it goes back to your network, the more you are able to prove your concept over and over again, the more they will end up referring you.   

Q: What are some tips for companies when looking to hire a service provider? When we were validating the market need for our practice, a common theme came to light: I’m paraphrasing, but it went something like, “I wish I had spent the additional dollars investing in a premium advisor earlier on vs. always going with the cheapest at first.”  We ended up hearing this a lot since start-ups that became successful ended up having to spend a lot more money fixing earlier mistakes within their accounting records, their taxes, corporate organization, or other internal processes.  Our value isn’t necessarily in that we do good accounting work – which we certainly do! – but, rather, it’s that we do this all the time and we’ve experienced these same obstacles many times before.  Having an Emerging Companies advisor on your team doesn’t just give you an extra sounding board, it gives you the knowledge of a 300+ advisory firm that specializes in over 20 service areas.  When looking for a service provider, look for a strategic partner that will add value along the way – from your entry to your exit -- and not someone that will just check a box with the lowest price.

Q: You went to work at a startup and then went back to the corporate side, what are some of the differences you see? Both environments have their own pros and cons, like anything else; I believe these are the two best things from each side:

  • Start-up Side: I think the biggest thing start-ups have as an advantage is their flat management structure.  There are not many layers between lower-level employees and the CEO.  A flat structure in a start-up organization provides the flexibility to pivot and adjust to unforeseen market conditions while having the attention of the CEO to stay on mission.  It also allows for innovation of the product features to continue to develop.  Respective department heads will have different views of ongoing issues in the product/service.  Those views can efficiently be communicated up to the CEO for action.  A second benefit in working with a start-up is the problem solving.  When a problem arises in your area of expertise, you are the only one that has the tools to fix it.  It allows for creative reasoning and the ability to recommend appropriate changes.  The feeling you get when a solution is implemented and it works is incredible!

  • Corporate Side: On the corporate side, a big benefit is the structure and job security of the company.  As an employee in a corporation, you are hired for a defined purpose, you know what you have to do to meet the needs of that position and anything above those needs are seen as you performing an excellent job.  There is less chaos working for a larger organization which allows you the comfort and work-life balance you may wish to have.  In addition, resources tend to be more plentiful.  So, in the instance where there is a strong initiative to attack a new revenue stream, internal investment can be pulled together to make it happen vs. targeting outside investors.

Q: I grew up learning the basics of debits and credits, but what are some unique issues that early-stage technology companies face on the accounting front? One area where start-ups tend to have questions is in software development costs: specifically, should you capitalize them or expense them? The simple answer is to expense these costs if the product is not yet feasible; if the product is already in production, you should capitalize the costs. I would refer to GAAP codification code 985-20-25-1 through 25-11 for more detail.

Another area that is commonly misunderstood is when to pay employees in equity versus payroll. All too often, this is not recorded by the start-up and requires pricey clean-up of the financial statements later. You should be recording the wages/consulting fees as an expense during the vesting period and crediting the other side of the entry to equity in stock options.

One of the newer areas that startups are discussing lately is ASC 606, revenue recognition on long-term customer contracts.  In the past, you would recognize the revenue of the contract evenly. For example, let’s say on a 12-month contract of $12,000 annually, you would recognize $1,000 in revenue per month.  The change under ASC 606 now requires you to recognize revenue after certain milestones are hit in the contract.  Under that same example, let’s say we decided that 10% of the fee related to onboarding, 50% of the fee related to the successful completion of the software, and 40% after the software was tested and delivered.  Instead of recognizing the revenue evenly, you may recognize $1,200 in month 1 after the onboarding process, then $6,000 in month 8 after the custom software was developed, and the $4,800 in month 12 after the product was delivered.  This can create a revenue recognition nightmare especially for start-ups when most of their early contracts are custom and all different.

Lastly, another area to pay attention to is ASC 480, distinguishing liabilities from equity.  This is often a missed area with early-stage investment as the investors typically request convertible notes as their equity approach.  There are various cases where you should record it as a liability and others when it should be treated as equity. 

You can reach Rich at 440-386-5164 or rmazzola@skodaminotti.com.

Companies Hiring

This Week’s Events

Future Events

Interesting Reads

  • Crain’s Cleveland: BoxCast expands in the worship market with the acquisition of Florida company Sunday Streams

  • Cleveland Plain-Dealer: Young professionals like Cleveland area but leave; local groups aim to keep them

  • Cleveland Plain-Dealer: Cleveland Rising welcomes new voices, but critics worry status quo will persist

Requests

  • Let me know if your company is hiring

  • Let me know if you are hosting an event

  • If you are interested or know someone who would be interested in being highlighted for our profile of the week, let me know.

About The Author

My name is Ari Lewis and I do comms/pr for technology companies and am a partner at venture capital firm focused on blockchain companies. Follow me on twitter @amlewis4 or connect with me on LinkedIn. Always open to meeting new folks. Email me if you want to get coffee.

What's Happening This Week: 10/20/19

Hi, welcome to the Cleveland Tech newsletter. I talk about all things tech in the Cleveland community. 

The Blockland Solutions Conference was kind enough to offer a discount to folks who subscribe to the newsletter. If you are looking to attend check out: https://www.blocklandsolutions.com and type CLETECH to save 20% on your ticket.

Profile of the Week

Name: Kurtis Jensen
Current Job: Software developer. Founder of oBuilds, LLC, a small software development shop based in Cleveland.
Favorite restaurant in town? The Fairmount Martini and Wine Bar
Favorite thing about Cleveland? I love that I can live in the woods and work in the city

Q: There are many software development firms out there, what makes you different? Skin in the game. We make strategic investments and in-kind contributions to the majority of our customers to help them succeed. Having upside and downside depending on whether or not our customers succeed gives us an inherent long-term interest in our customers. Offering our services to customers at discounted rates allows their money to go further than with competing development agencies, and reduces the risk of them running out of capital before hitting key milestones.

Q: What are some of the common errors you see startups make when it comes to software development? I think that overly-complex architectures are the number one killer of projects that I have seen in my career. In software, the difference between theory and practice is very real, and I think that a lot of developers tend to assume ideal conditions while designing their products. In practice, those assumptions break down, leaving them with systems that are brittle, that are hard/expensive to extend and understand, or that do not work at all. Also, startups will often create a minimum-viable product (MVP) to get their idea off the ground, but will not budget for replacing that system with something that can really serve the market. This becomes particularly problematic when the MVP is written using a system that is inherently limited, such as WordPress, where there are low barriers to getting something started, but cannot provide complex/custom functionality without a lot of error-prone modifications.

Q: You used to live in NYC, why did you return to Cleveland? Because, as Mike Polk Jr. said, in Cleveland, you can buy a house for the price of a VCR. To put it a different way, when I was living in NYC, I realized that I was doing all of the same things that I did when I lived in Cleveland, but at nearly double the cost. This was the root cause of the decline in the standard of living that I experienced when I left Cleveland for NYC. When I returned to Cleveland, I rented a 2,400 sq ft penthouse in Cleveland Heights for less than I rented a 200 sq ft studio in Manhattan.

Q: What do you look for when hiring a software developer? I look for someone who tells the truth. In my career, I have probably only given one formal technical interview, and it was when I was working as an employee of another software company. My hiring process works like this: I ask a prospective developer “I have a project which requires X. Can you do it?” If they tell me “yes”, then I believe them. In the case that they were lying, and they can’t do what they said they could do, then I would know within a few days of hiring them. In that case, I would probably have to let them go.

Q: What are some of the challenges going from an employee to a manager? For me, this was definitely letting go of control. I came from a background where I was the sole developer of an application, so I would need to know everything about how the application worked, and I had a particular way of doing things. When working with a team, especially on larger software projects, it’s impossible to know how everything works, and it’s not reasonable to expect that everyone writes code the same way that you do. This is something that I still struggle with sometimes, and I ask my developers to let me know if I am being overbearing.

Companies Hiring

This Week’s Events

Future Events

Interesting Reads

Requests

  • Let me know if your company is hiring

  • Let me know if you are hosting an event

  • If you are interested or know someone who would be interested in being highlighted for our profile of the week, let me know.

About The Author

My name is Ari Lewis and I do comms/pr for technology companies and am a partner at venture capital firm focused on blockchain companies. Follow me on twitter @amlewis4 or connect with me on LinkedIn. Always open to meeting new folks. Email me if you want to get coffee.

What's Happening This Week: 10/13/19

Hi, welcome to the Cleveland Tech newsletter. I talk about all things tech in the Cleveland community. The Blockland Solutions Conference was kind enough to offer a discount to folks who subscribe to the newsletter. If you are looking to attend check out: https://www.blocklandsolutions.com and type CLETECH to save 20% on your ticket.

Profile of the Week

Name:  Dr. Suzanne Rivera
Current Job: Vice President for Research and Technology Management, CWRU
Favorite restaurant in town?  Felice in Larchmere
Favorite thing about Cleveland?
  I love Cleveland’s grit and can-do spirit.  I always root for the underdog!

Q: Suzanne, you have a really interesting role as Vice President for Research and Technology Management at Case Western Reserve University? Can you tell the readers about your role? I think I’ve got the greatest job in the world.  I support research and scholarship across all of our schools and the college, so I get to learn new things every day.  Whether a project is about engineering or poetry or medicine—it doesn’t matter.  I dig in and learn about the topic so I can support the work our faculty and students are pursuing.  I also help with taking our inventions and discoveries out of the university where they can benefit people by licensing our IP to companies, whether start-ups or established enterprises.  That is especially gratifying because then I can see that our work really has impact.

Q: I think that you have such a fantastic background. You grew up in an immigrant family and were on public assistance as a child but then you went on to earn a Ph.D. and serve in a senior role at a prestigious academic institution. What advice would you have for people who come from low-income backgrounds who are looking to move into a position such as the one you have? I feel incredibly grateful for the opportunities I’ve been given.  The most important advice I can give is to get as much education as your circumstances allow.  And cultivate your tenacity.  I didn’t go back for my Ph.D. until I was a 35-year old mother of two school-aged kids.  It was tough but worth it.  My degrees don’t make me any more important than anybody else, but my schooling has opened doors of possibility that I never imagined as a child. 

Q: Can you talk about some of the great intellectual property that has been spun out of Case Western? There is so much! People may not realize that more than 60 patents are issued to CWRU each year.  As far as companies spinning out of the university based on faculty IP, we’ve had more than 35 in the last five years. I am amazed by the breadth of technologies that have been developed at CWRU, from medical applications to innovations in manufacturing and energy.  One spin-off we are watching keenly right now is Folio Photonics. They are reinventing data archiving with a new optical storage solution.

Q: One of your responsibilities at Case Western Reserve is public affairs. What is some policy (either at a state or federal level) that you would like implemented that could spur more innovation at the university level? I believe strongly that immigrants make America great.  I think we need to create immigration policies that allow US universities to attract talent from all over the world, and then make it easy for our graduates and foreign faculty to get on a path to citizenship so they can put down roots and contribute to the economic development of the country.

Q: Suzanne, I know that CWRU is strong in STEM but you’ve recently been working hard at advancing the idea of a “tech-plus” approach to innovation.  Can you explain that concept? Sure.  What we mean by “tech-plus” is an interdisciplinary approach that brings together experts from different fields and end-users to look at technology through the lens of impact on humanity.  What are the ethical, legal, and social implications?  How will this technology be used?  Can it be made accessible in an equitable way? Would anyone be harmed by it and what can we do to mitigate the risks?  That kind of approach to technology development can only be undertaken if you have a variety of people around the table—including stakeholders from outside the university.

Companies Hiring

This Week’s Events

Future Events

Interesting Reads

Requests

  • Let me know if your company is hiring

  • Let me know if you are hosting an event

  • If you are interested or know someone who would be interested in being highlighted for our profile of the week, let me know.

About The Author

My name is Ari Lewis and I do comms/pr for technology companies and am a partner at venture capital firm focused on blockchain companies. Follow me on twitter @amlewis4 or connect with me on LinkedIn. Always open to meeting new folks. Email me if you want to get coffee.

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