What's Happening This Week: 04/05/20

Hi, welcome to the Cleveland Tech newsletter. I talk about all things tech in the Cleveland community. I hope everyone is staying safe.

I’m hosting a virtual event this week. Registration is limited and expected to sell out so sign-up today.

Starting next week, I’ll be using a new email platform, Goodbits, to send out the newsletter. Please make sure that my email, me@arilewis.com, is in your safe sender’s list. If you don’t receive it next week, check your spam and mark it as safe for future emails.

Profile of the Week

Disclaimer: This interview was conducted before the coronavirus pandemic.

Name: Neil Singh
Current Job: Director of Technology at Team NEO
Favorite restaurant in town? Melt for Sandwiches, Mables for BBQ, Stancatos for Italian, Fengs for Asian.
Favorite thing about Cleveland? The community here is very welcoming, as an import to Cleveland originally from New Zealand. I was very impressed at how kind, caring and helpful people were when I first arrived, it helped me settle quickly here and get networked. From a scenic point of view, It’s a well-organized and beautiful city being by the lake is a wonderful asset, and you don’t need to drive too far to reach farmland, skiing, and a number of other activities, Ohio and Northeast Ohio is a great place to live.

Q: Neil, you are from New Zealand, what are some of the biggest cultural differences between the United States and New Zealand? From a business point of view, the US is much more entrepreneurial, tech savvy, better for investment and generally more stable economically and has several industries that simply do not exist in New Zealand, advanced manufacturing, automotive and aerospace are examples of this.

I think the strength of the economy and a fair cost of living vs. earning capacity here in the USA makes it easier for people to progress because comparatively speaking New Zealand is very expensive compared to the USA.

If we put the focus back on people and define culture as far as diversity, then I would say I have discovered many more ethnic groups here in the USA and for the most part, people regardless of their ethnic background seem to get along here, I know there are things here which need work too but it also seems people are prepared to speak out and work on them in the USA rather than cover them up and pretend they don’t exist.

In New Zealand, there are 4 main demographics Maori (the indigenous people of NZ), Europeans, Polynesians (people from the south pacific islands) and Asians. New Zealand strongly maintains a politically correct stance on everything, but in all honesty, this often hides the true feelings of the local population, as discrimination is obvious in many ways.

Q: Neil, you spent time programming and then shifted to a management role when you joined Mirari, what were some of the biggest challenges transitioning to a management role? Mirari is a startup and having been in the hustle of previous startups in what is now nearly a 20-year career for me I did not find it too difficult to make the transition. The biggest challenge tends to be raising money for projects or securing the larger or more sustainable deals.

As a developer, you are problem-solving most of the time in an attempt to perfect your code so that the app you are building works as it should, and as a CSO you are also problem solving and attempting to identify strengths and weaknesses all the time within the business model and taking appropriate actions as necessary to help the business grow.

In terms of challenges for the company, reducing lead times, knowing who is or isn’t genuine about a project, being able to correctly read the situation, there are many soft skills I had to learn, closing the sale and deal flow are two skills I continue to work on but learning how to do that while building a relationship is critical, you do not want to be pushy in any situation, its about adding value.

For Mirari, founder David Pollock and I have collaborated on a number of POC’s for companies like Acura, Ford, Bosch, Unity, Reflekt etc.

From a pragmatic point of view management roles whether it was with Mirari or now with Team NEO, means continued learning, and improvement of my own skills especially in areas such as deal flow, strategy and communication.

Q: Last May you joined Team NEO. Many folks are familiar with the organization but don't necessarily know what you do? Can you talk about both your role within Team NEO as well as the broader objectives of the organizations? Team NEO is an economic development organization and also the official partner of JobsOhio within the 18-county area of Northeast Ohio. Our directors all have backgrounds working in different industries and our role is to seek out companies within our specific market segment “in my case technology companies” and support business retention and expansion for companies in Northeast Ohio and on occasions business attraction for companies in other states or countries who we would like investing into Ohio.

Q: If you had a magic wand, what is one thing you would do to change the Cleveland technology community? Free up capital resources for early stage pre-seed investments. There is a significant gap which many of our startups in technology suffer from when it comes to raising enough money in the early days of a business when it’s in innovation mode or has only a small bucket of clients but not enough revenue to consider it lucrative or attractive to investors. Often enough however the startups in this ‘black hole of funding’ tend to need the most help to scale their business.

Our investors locally tend to see this as very high risk, but when examined carefully the investment community locally does not seem to employ more sophisticated strategies for early-stage investing such as syndicating amount invested and taking less equity at an early stage. We also seem to lack genuine accelerators which can churn out not just 1 or 2 good startups every few years but dozens of them per year.

There is a method or intelligence involved in creating or duplicating the results that markets like Silicon Valley have, in fact, its an exact science, there is a structured way to invest in pre-revenue innovation startups to help them grow, scale and create value quickly.

I would say we need to think long and hard locally about why we are not pragmatically employing strategies which already exist and have been proven nationally and globally in other areas.

We need to focus on the founders and focus on building an ecosystem around them which helps them thrive, otherwise we will lose that talent to other places that do provide them that environment for creating success.

Q: You met your wife playing video games, how'd that happen? Since around 2014 we both played Guild Wars 2 together, many of the US players in that game are from the Midwest. In New Zealand and Australia, you had to join a US server in the early days just to play.

My wife and I shared the same server and our guilds collaborated in battlegrounds, that’s how we got to know each other. Gaming led to more normal email exchanges which then led to me visiting her in 2016, the rest is history we worked out, and I found my new home in Northeast Ohio.

Companies Hiring

Virtual Events

Interesting Reads

  • Crain’s Cleveland: A generational test: Are we great enough?

  • FOX19: Cleveland man 3D printing masks and donating them to local hospital

  • NEWS5 Cleveland: Companies, non-profits getting creative to help Ohio’s medical professionals stay safe

Requests

  • Let me know if your company is hiring

  • Let me know if you are hosting an event

  • If you are interested or know someone who would be interested in being highlighted for our profile of the week, let me know.

About The Author

My name is Ari Lewis. I’m an expert on strategic communications and my day job is helping run, GreenBlock Group, a strategic communications and innovation consultancy firm. I’m also the co-founder of OhioX, a nonprofit organization that represents and connects those committed to growing Ohio’s economy through technology and innovation. Follow me on twitter @amlewis4 or connect with me on LinkedIn. Always open to meeting new folks. Email me if you want to get coffee.

If someone forwarded you this email, sign up below.

What's Happening This Week: 03/29/20

Hi, welcome to the Cleveland Tech newsletter. I talk about all things tech in the Cleveland community. I hope everyone is staying safe.

I’m hosting two virtual events this week. My virtual happy hour last week sold out within a few hours so if you are interested in attending either event, sign up fast as registration will be limited. Both events are free to attend.

  1. Tuesday, March 31st at 1:30 PM - Q&A with Peter Martin, Gamification and UX Expert

  2. Thursday, April 2nd at 10:30 AM - Cleveland Tech Newsletter Virtual Coffee

Profile of the Week

Disclaimer: This interview was conducted before the coronavirus pandemic.

Name: Mike McGill
Current Job: Chief Information Office at Medical Service Company
Favorite restaurant in town? We are blessed to have so many great restaurants in Cleveland, but my go to is Sasa on Shaker Square. Their sushi is awesome and the Sasa fries might be the single most delicious food in Cleveland.
Favorite thing about Cleveland?  There is just so much to do here, and something to do for every interest. I can take my family to a Tribe game on Saturday and to the art museum on Sunday. From the museums, to Playhouse Square, to the local sports teams, there is something for everybody.

Q: Mike, you started your career at BP and then ended up moving to Medical Service Company. For those looking to start their careers, what advice do you have for considering the benefits of joining a large company versus a smaller company? Of the two, I have enjoyed my time at Medical Service Company much more. But that is because I prefer to be a little bit of  a “jack of all trades”. In my career, I have preferred to get my hands into a lot of different technologies vs. specializing in and spending most of my time in a single technology. Also, I prefer the nimbleness of a smaller company. We can come up with a great idea on Monday and have it in place by Tuesday. Our bottlenecks tend to be more resource-driven and not caused by bureaucracy and red tape. So, if you prefer to specialize in a specific technology, a larger organization may be for you. If you like variety and working on several different technologies, a smaller or middle-market organization might be right for you.

Q: Since 2000, you've spent the majority of your career at Medical Service Company, can you tell the readers about what you do? Yes, I have been with Medical Service Company since 2000. That is quite a while, but it is such a great company. As I stated earlier, a smaller, family-owned business just “fits” me. It is a great organization, with great people, and a great mission of caring for our patients. As I stated earlier, I have the pleasure of working in the several areas within the organization. My title is CIO, and in that role, I lead our digital transformation objectives. From infrastructure, to development, to integration my job is to make sure our technology strategy supports our overall organizational strategy. I also lead our e-commerce/digital marketing initiatives, which is a great ying to the IT yang. I love the diversity of going from a technical discussion with the IT team to a creative discussion with the digital marketing team. I also oversee our integration activities. Medical Service Company has largely grown by acquisition over the years. One of my jobs is to oversee the integration activities to make sure the newly acquired company and team members successfully integrate and feel “at home” at Medical Service Company.

Q: A common question I ask technical mangers on the newsletter is handling their transition from developer to management. How did you adjust to the transition and what advice do you have for developers hesitant about making the transition to management?  Great question! So many people in Information technology get promoted to leadership opportunities because of the fact that they are great technologists. They may not get the support and training they need to successfully make the transition and it may end up turning into a “trial by fire” situation. A few pieces of advice I would give to any aspiring Information technology Leader. One, learn about Emotional Intelligence. Having the ability to recognize the emotional states of others and empathize is powerful. Second, learn about and practice Servant Leadership. The best leaders truly care about the people they manage. Being a leader is a great opportunity to serve others. Lastly, find a mentor (or mentors) who can help you learn the ropes. Either through a formal business coach arrangement, or informally through other leaders, you work with and admire. A good mentor can help you find your blind spots and continue to improve.

Q: What have been some of the biggest challenges of being a CIO in Cleveland? I would say that until recently my biggest challenge was feeling like I was kind of on an island. I just didn’t feel like there were good opportunities to network and idea share with my CIO peers and other technology leaders in Northeast Ohio. That was probably my own fault for not looking hard enough. A few years back I joined the Cleveland chapter of the Society for Information Management (SIM). More recently I became a member of the Greater Cleveland Partnership’s Northeast Ohio CIO Forum. Both have proven to be great networking opportunities. I would definitely encourage any technology leader who is looking to “get out there” more and strengthen their professional network to consider joining the Society for Information Management (https://chapter.simnet.org/cleveland/home). It really has helped me to strengthen my network and I have met so many great technology leaders to idea share with.

Q: You are involved in a few charitable organizations such as SIM. How has volunteering helped play a role in your life? In the end, it just feels good to give back a little. As a member of SIM, I have been given the opportunity to support our education outreach initiatives. We support local IT talent development by sponsoring coding camps and providing scholarships to students with information technology-related majors at local universities. There are so many great technology career opportunities in Northeast Ohio. Having an opportunity to play even a small role in supporting local IT talent development has been very rewarding. In this role, I have also had the opportunity to meet so many great people doing great work developing our IT talent pipeline. I also recently became a mentor in the College Now program. This has been a wonderful opportunity to work one on one with a college student and just “be there” to answer questions and provide support and encouragement. Again, it just feels good to share some of my time and experience to support causes that resonate with me.

Check out Michael’s blog

Companies Hiring

Virtual Events This Week

Interesting Reads

Requests

  • Let me know if your company is hiring

  • Let me know if you are hosting an event

  • If you are interested or know someone who would be interested in being highlighted for our profile of the week, let me know.

About The Author

My name is Ari Lewis. I’m an expert on strategic communications and my day job is helping run, GreenBlock Group, a strategic communications and innovation consultancy firm. I’m also the co-founder of OhioX, a nonprofit organization that represents and connects those committed to growing Ohio’s economy through technology and innovation. Follow me on twitter @amlewis4 or connect with me on LinkedIn. Always open to meeting new folks. Email me if you want to get coffee.

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What's Happening This Week: 03/22/20

Hi, welcome to the Cleveland Tech newsletter. I talk about all things tech in the Cleveland community.

I hope everyone is staying safe. This week I wrote an article in Crain’s which was titled, Remote work is just getting started.

Also, I decided to announce a Cleveland Tech Newsletter Virtual Happy Hour this week. I ended up having to close registration due to high demand, but I hope to make this a regular thing. Keep your eye out for the next one.

Profile of the Week

Name: Tim Hoolihan
Current Job: Centric Consulting: Cleveland Practice Lead, Data & Analytics 
Favorite restaurant in town? Cleveland: Mabel’s BBQ, Akron: Ken Stewart’s Lodge
Favorite thing about Cleveland? The park systems we have are amazing, I’m a fan of the towpath in particular

Q: Tim, you just joined Centric Consulting 7 months ago as their practice lead for data and analytics. What does that role entail? Centric is a national consulting firm that focuses on local presence. I work for the Cleveland Business Unit, which provides services for a variety of public and private organizations in Northeast Ohio. However, we have access to consultants on the national teams that may travel in or work virtually. This helps Centric provide a variety of expertise with flexibility and scale. My job is to build out a practice locally that specializes in data analysis, visualization, and data science for organizations in the area. Our work ranges from data definition documents to data warehouses, to machine learning and more. 

That role starts with meeting with clients to understand their opportunities and define what kind of project we can collaborate on. The next responsibility is to build out the right team to complete the project. Finally, I work with the team and project manager to ensure each project stays on track. 

I enjoy the variety of clients and projects we work with, and the chance to collaborate with so many great Cleveland organizations. Data Science is an evolving field, and there are always new things to learn.

Q: Before Centric, you were at a product company called DialogTech, what was your role there? For background, DialogTech helps marketers track conversations across channels. For considered purchases (like auto sales, real estate, or legal services) it is common for consumers to research online but then move to telephone research before completing the sale. DialogTech’s product suite helped marketers tie phone calls to online marketing efforts.

My role was to build a data science department. Up until that point, the product suite was known for tracking users across channels. But the journey stopped there. It would be like Amazon tracking it’s marketing from search engine to an amazon page, but then ignoring whether a customer actually purchased or not. The data science team built models that helped close the last bit of the loop. These were deep learning models, using tensorflow, keras, pytorch, and other related technologies.

I assisted the team in a variety of ways, including some of the technical work and prototyping before we had fully hired the team. However, I focused on strategic things that helped leverage the smart women and men of the team. For example, since most of our Machine Learning models were supervised learning, I spent a lot of time and effort building out a team and process for part-time workers to listen to and label calls. This allowed our modelers to focus on the problem, rather than collecting data. I also worked closely with our product department to make sure we were aligning our models with customer’s needs.

Q: What are some of the trends you are seeing in the big data space? Cloud migration is a trend across IT disciplines, but I think it is emphasized even more in analytics. Building an on-premises big data solution these days is fairly difficult to justify.

In addition, I would say as many organizations are stepping back from Hadoop, we are seeing new approaches to big data. In other words, hybrid approaches using the right tool for the right job. Removing structure from data that is already relational is probably not a great idea. But neither is forcing raw data into a relational structure just to be stored. For example, rarely should you store images in a database.

Finally, I would point out solutions like Snowflake are gaining popularity. Tools like that use some of the clustering techniques of Hadoop under the hood, but provide an interface familiar to those who come from a relational world. 

Q: Many companies are constantly collecting data, but not very good at utilizing it properly. What are the most common mistakes you see from companies when it pertains to utilizing their data sets to the best of their ability? The first problem I see is that data solutions are built starting with engineering. A developer surveys what data is available and starts creating solutions or reports. As any good UX person would tell you, ask instead what does the end-user need? How often is this insight useful? Then work backward from there to build an appropriate solution that will create value.

The next problem I see is incorrectly capturing data. This problem can manifest itself in many ways, but I’ll highlight a few examples. We find clients that track a health score for their accounts. But they don’t capture those over time. If you don’t retain historical data, you can’t analyze trends. Another example is some consistent definition of subjective measurements. Back to our client health score, what does that mean? And does each account manager calculate it the same? Better yet, if it’s calculated based on a few qualifying factors (number of employees, size of the account, recency of contact), why not capture those factors directly and automate the calculation? Your information and insights are limited by the quality of your data.

Finally, I’d like to comment on the term “data-driven”. It has become a bit cliche. The intent is good, but I think a mature organization is “data-informed”. Models aren’t perfect, and they may be missing context. I like to illustrate this with a narrative of two companies that have SaaS products that are tracking page usage statistics to decide which features to focus on and keep. The “data-driven” organization cuts the dashboard that users only use the first week of onboarding and fall off ever using. The “data-informed” organization talked to their Sales department and found out that a dashboard is key to 95% of sales demos and made an exception to keep that page, despite the low metrics. Human insight and context still have value in making decisions.

Q: What is it like working for a virtual company? How does that impact your time at home? While I’ve had the ability to work from home before, this is my first time remote full-time, as we don’t have offices. There are some great perks that come with that. I started the week my kids went back to school, and it was easy to step away for 10 minutes to see them off to the bus on their first day. My dog, a Boston Terrier named Bogey, can come visit my office anytime he wants. Many days, I’ll go for a walk or run over lunch. That said it comes with challenges. It can be hard to “turn off” work at the end of the day. And our company has to be intentional about getting time face to face, etc. However, as I do this interview, America is dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic. I consider myself lucky that I was already adjusted to work from home and do not have some of the child-care challenges others are facing with schools closed, etc. Centric has been very supportive of employees through this, and supporting each other is really part of our company DNA. 

In better times, I like that occasional working from coffee shops and finding other ways to stay in touch with the Cleveland tech community. It’s a great community. I appreciate the chance to be a part of this interview as one of the many ways Cleveland works together. Thanks for keeping the conversation going in Northeast Ohio, Ari!

Companies Hiring

Virtual Events This Week

Tech Joke of the Week

Kudos to newsletter reader Rob Farren for the wonderful joke this week.

What computer sings best? A Dell

Interesting Reads

  • Invest Like the Best: Brent Beshore – Update on Small Business and Private Equity (This is a podcast)

  • WKYC: Cleveland non-profit in high demand amid COVID-19 pandemic, needs help to fight digital divide

  • Cleveland Plain-Dealer: Hudson teacher hopes free online resources can spark creativity, learning during coronavirus crisis

Requests

  • Let me know if your company is hiring

  • Let me know if you are hosting an event

  • If you are interested or know someone who would be interested in being highlighted for our profile of the week, let me know.

About The Author

My name is Ari Lewis. I’m the co-founder of OhioX, a nonprofit organization that represents and connects those committed to growing Ohio’s economy through technology and innovation. I’m also the co-founder of GreenBlock Group, a strategic communications and innovation consultancy firm. Follow me on twitter @amlewis4 or connect with me on LinkedIn. Always open to meeting new folks. Email me if you want to get coffee.

If someone forwarded you this email, sign up below.

What's Happening This Week: 03/15/20

Hi, welcome to the Cleveland Tech newsletter. I talk about all things tech in the Cleveland community.

First off I’d like to start the newsletter off by hoping that everyone is staying safe out there. The Ohio Department of Health has set up a website for tips on keeping safe which you can check out HERE.

I’ve removed the events page and will reinstate as events start getting hosted again. I’ve also heard of folks beginning to plan virtual events so if you know of any, send my way and I’ll post.

Lastly, Akram Boutros, CEO of MetroHealth, wrote a letter in the Plain-Dealer this week and one line really stuck out to me, “And remember, this is Cleveland. We can overcome anything.”

On that note, off to the newsletter.

PS, have a surprise temporary section to replace events.

Profile of the Week

Name: Craig Waters
Current Job: CFO & CMO of TRAZER
Favorite restaurant in town? Flying Fig in Ohio City and Russo’s near Hudson.
Favorite thing about Cleveland? The underappreciated things that the city has are some of the best in America.  The culinary diversity and excellence is unbelievable in the city and in the surrounding communities.  The Theatre district is amazing.  The Weather is awesome ¾ of the year.   Our Metroparks, trails and outdoor activities and events are also top-notch.

Q: Craig, you are currently the CFO/CMO of Trazer, joining the company in 2017. How did you end up joining them after spending much of your career at large companies? My Evolution from big to small led me from Ernst & Young to Time Warner to a move to Ohio in 1993 when Time Warner bought a multi-channel marketing company called FitnessQuest in a pre-packaged bankruptcy.  The new CEO we hired, asked me to come out and be part of the executive team to run it.  We built that business from $0 to over $300M.  It was there that I first met Barry, Sr (TRAZER founder) and his family, who were looking for someone to license or partner with them.  The concept was 10-15 years ahead of its time and costly to develop and build. FitnessQuest couldn’t do the deal at that time, but I made a small seed investment in their financing round and always kept track of their progress.  FitnessQuest was very entrepreneurial in that we licensed inventors products, produced spots and infomercials and built their brands and then sold the product in all channels.  The roots for my joining TRAZER in 2017 started there building and scaling early-stage concepts into multi-million $ brands, like Total Gym (Chuck Norris), Gazelle Gliders (Tony Little), BOSU, Ab Lounge (over 7 million sold) and Sham-Wow.  The experiences there in evaluation, development, building marketing and distribution plans are very similar to early-stage building and scaling growth.  When I was networking looking for my next opportunity in 2017, I met with Barry, Jr. who was commercializing the TRAZER technology and he asked me to come on board.  For me, it was the perfect alignment of experience, skillsets, my passion for the sports/healthcare tech space and opportunity.

Q: Can you share with the audience what Trazer does and the types of clients you serve? Whether it’s walking, talking, painting, or playing a sport – without our brain, our bodies don’t function. So why do we assess, train, and rehabilitate individuals in an isolated fashion only focusing on the musculoskeletal system? TRAZER is changing the game by integrating cognitive challenges with movement to holistically assess, train, and rehab individuals. When the brain and body work together individuals experience superior outcomes and are an overall healthier person.  Our mission is to advance human health and performance through the objective quantification of the mind-body connection.  Our ultimate audience is ages 4 to 104 across all demographics optimizing and measuring movement, but our focus today is Sports Medicine (Alabama, LSU, Clemson, Georgia and more), Physical Therapy (Ascension, Fyzical Therapy & Balance, MOTION PT, Select) and Senior Health (Holiday, Atria, Civitas).  Everybody Moves but we don’t do a very good job of objectively measuring the movements or how the mind drives it.  For example, with all the information we capture for healthcare (blood pressure, pulse, cholesterol, height, weight, EKG), we don’t measure what matters regarding mind-body movement.  The cost of orthopedic, neuro disorder, TBI, falls is hundreds of billions, yet movement deficiencies which are pre-cursers to injury and disease are not captured until now with the TRAZER technology.

Q: Most of your background is in financial accounting at large companies, how did that background help serve you when joining a startup and what were some of the skillsets you had to learn that you didn't necessarily have when you joined? I’ve been fortunate to get experience in a multitude of areas including sales, marketing,  business development in addition to finance.  With an early-stage entity, being able to wear multiple hats is important, but the finance and business understanding is critical to understanding the cost structure, margins, costs per order necessary to making the business successful.  I don’t believe you can make it up on volume and you have to target point where you turn a profit and are no longer dependent on your next capital raise to keep growing.  It also helps with negotiating deals with banks, Venture Capital, Joint Ventures and working through the financial ramifications of each transaction.  Finally with the incredible value of the data being built and delivered by our technology, my comfort with numbers, statistics and the algorithms we are building is another asset that I can bring to the table.

Q: We've seen a big trend in professional sports league's getting more and more serious about player's health. Is this reverberating across high school and college sports as well? What can leagues do to continue to decrease injuries statistics? The importance of data & analytics, sports science and health has become more and more important as we learn more, but we still have only scratched the surface of where we need to be. The athletes are getting stronger and faster every year, so the only real way to decrease injury statistics is to take a healthcare perspective instead of a sick-care perspective.  What I mean is we typically treat the patient or athlete after they are injured and rehab them, and when we rehab them are we rehabbing them to get back in the game as soon as possible or for the lowest possible risk of re-injury? TRAZER quantifies what actually matters through the ability to see (vision), process (cognitive), and execute (motor/physicality). These are several other key points;

  1. Tests the athlete in a sports specific analogous environment to the field of play using reactive based (not pre-planned) patterns measuring an athlete’s ability to stop, start and change direction.

  2. TRAZER can quantify injury risk looking at an athlete’s movement asymmetry. When organizations are spending millions on an athlete, their risk of injury is significant in their decision making. The famous adage; “If we can’t measure, we can’t improve” has never been truer with TRAZER. By knowing the athlete’s risk on the front end, we can mitigate that risk and build a healthier, better performer.

  3. Test/measure the athlete frequently to monitor progress or degradation over time, overtraining such that we can mitigate or use therapy to address an injury before it becomes major.

These key points are not just critical in sport, but in life. It allows TRAZER to continue to expand and grow into physical therapy, the senior market and more.

Q: What attributes drives your why and passion the most?  Family and key core values, being a lifelong learner and the opportunity with something like TRAZER to help millions of people with our technology.  Something very few people know about my wife and I is we adopted a 6-year-old boy from Russia 16 years ago after having 3 girls of our own.  We can’t imagine today what life would be without him.  The experience of bringing our son into our family and the support from the community in NE Ohio was unbelievable.  From the 2 trips to Russia in the middle of winter, the 1st days together while waiting on his papers to finalize with the embassy, to the arrival home to his sisters and grandparents.  We are so proud of everything he has accomplished against lottery-like odds from an orphanage across the globe to a family in NE Ohio. 

Companies Hiring

Tech Joke of the Week

Why did the developer go broke? Because he used up all his cache. (If you have any funny jokes, send them my way.)

Interesting Reads

Requests

  • Let me know if your company is hiring

  • Let me know if you are hosting an event

  • If you are interested or know someone who would be interested in being highlighted for our profile of the week, let me know.

About The Author

My name is Ari Lewis. I’m the co-founder of OhioX, a nonprofit organization that represents and connects those committed to growing Ohio’s economy through technology and innovation. I’m also the co-founder of GreenBlock Group, a strategic communications and innovation consultancy firm. Follow me on twitter @amlewis4 or connect with me on LinkedIn. Always open to meeting new folks. Email me if you want to get coffee.

If someone forwarded you this email, sign up below.

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